50 Years
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The Legacy of Fort Point - Military Fortification, Light House and Tourism Haven

The Legacy of Fort Point - Military Fortification, Light House and Tourism Haven
Come and explore the long and varied history associated with a piece of land at the entrance to Trinity Harbour in Newfoundland and Labrador that was formerly named Admiral’s Point and after 1812, Fort Point. A point of land situated on the western shore to the entrance of Trinity Harbour which helps protect the Harbour and makes it one of the best “sailing ship” havens in the world.  By the mid-18th century, Trinity Harbour was one of the busiest shipping and most important commercial ports along the Atlantic. In 1746 the area was fortified with three batteries mounting 18 guns, a store house, a powder magazine, barracks for 224 soldiers and a pavilion for 9 officers, surrounded by parapets and palisades. It was a well-stocked military site only at certain periods of time, which left it vulnerable and derelict, and subject to a takeover in 1762 by the French that was short lived but yet one that saw the fort destroyed. Fort Point has a varied history and this Community Memories project will explore it in detail from its beginnings as a fishing station to a military site.
 

The Art of Wooden Boat Building - A Dying Skill - The Vokey Family

The Art of Wooden Boat Building - A Dying Skill - The Vokey Family
Wooden boat building has a long-standing history in Trinity. In fact, it dates back to the late 1700s to the time of the early English-Newfoundland fish merchants who brought their master boat builders with them when they came to settle along the rugged coastline of Newfoundland. The last wooden boat building family in Trinity was the Vokey’s, who under the guidance of Henry Vokey began their career in wooden boat building in the 1960s. The shipyard that he owned and operated functioned until 1990, when it closed due to the change in market demands for vessels. This project focuses on the skills of master boat builder Henry Vokey and his life of building wooden vessels. This online exhibition allows visitors to view and understand the life of Henry Vokey and the role that he played in the shipbuilding industry in the Town of Trinity, and also the influence that he had on many boat builders in the province. It presents a perspective of how one man was able to turn a passion of shipbuilding into a life-long career. Henry's shipyard closed in 1990 after operating for twenty-six years. He did not give up making boats, as he continued to construct them as a pastime and spends his winters making model boats. In 2009, he began the construction of a traditional wooden schooner. Please enjoy your online exploration of the life, times and skill of master boat builder Henry Vokey.
 

They That Go Down to the Sea in Ships, Shipwrecks 1800 - 1945

They That Go Down to the Sea in Ships, Shipwrecks 1800 - 1945
Through this exhibit you will be able to learn about the history of the various vessels through photographs and archival material from our own archives, as well as our partners. This archival material contains various documents such as: ship crew lists and log books, accounts, investigation reports, insurance claims, underwater photos of wreckage and photographs of artefacts that have been recovered through underwater archaeological digs that were conducted in Trinity Harbour in 1977 where over a thousand artefacts were raised, cleaned and catalogued.
 

The Battle of the Somme: A Generation Lost But Never Forgotten

The Battle of the Somme: A Generation Lost But Never Forgotten
This exhibit reflects on the Battle of the Somme, mainly the Battle of Beaumont Hamel. The site has several sections which include, the Regiment, the Battle, Soldier/Family Stories, Commemoration, Additional Information and an Educational section. One of the highlights of this exhibit is the personal connection you will get as you read letters written by soldiers to their families back home.
 

The Art of Shipbuilding, An Inherited Skill

The Art of Shipbuilding, An Inherited Skill
Since the 1700s, Trinity has been known as a shipbuilding community from the time of Benjamin Lester, who had his own fleet of fishing ships built and who also built two vessels for the Royal Navy in Trinity, of which we have a copy of the plans, to the last couple of years when the Vokey family were building vessels for the offshore fishery. This exhibit will show the evolution of shipbuilding from traditional wooden boat building to the building of steel and fibreglass vessels in the Town of Trinity and around the Province of Newfoundland.
 

Slade and Kelson, A Merchants Perspective (1822 - 1852)

Slade and Kelson, A Merchants Perspective (1822 - 1852)
The Slade and Kelson diaries contain a day to day account of the business firm's daily activities at Trinity as well as general information on the state of the fishery, shipping, weather and the comings and goings of the various vessels and people. The diaries were kept by William Kelson, the manger for the company at Trinity from 1809-1851.
 

Artefacts Canada

The Trinity Museum is located in an old Salt Box house which dates from the 1880s. The house has four rooms on the ground floor, three on the second and a hallway on each floor. Each of the rooms has a particular theme which relates to the work in the local area. Click here to view many of the artefacts which are located at the museum.


Trinity Museum Content in the Virtual Museum of Canada


The Virtual Museum of Canada (VMC) showcases a rich collection of high-quality heritage content online, bringing together in innovative and dynamic ways the stories and treasures entrusted to Canadian museums.

Community Memories
These local history exhibits are created by community museums and provide a glimpse into what Canadians have in common and what makes us unique. The following Community Memories exhibits were contributed by Trinity Museum:

Restoration of Lester-Garland House
The Trinity Community Memories project tells the story of the Lester-Garland House, its reconstruction, between September 30, 1996 and June 21, 1997 and the use of the facility since it’s opening on June 25, 1997.

The Work of the Blacksmith - Green Family Forge, Trinity, NL
This virtual exhibit follows the inner workings of the Green Family Forge in five sections: the members of the Green Family; a brief history of blacksmithing; the restoration process that brought the forge back to life as a living history museum; some examples of more than 1,500 artefacts currently on display; and finally, how things are made at the forge including the items that our own blacksmith makes to sell at our gift shop.

The Hiscock House: The Tale of an Entrepreneurial Woman
This exhibit tells the story of Emma Hiscock who was left a widow and chose not to remarry—the path most widows would have taken in her day. Instead, to support the family, she used the resources left to her to provide the best life possible for her children.

The Trinity Benefit Club (TBC) - 170 Years of History, 1838 - 2008
On Candlemas Day, also known as Groundhog Day, in 1838, seventy-six men met at the Trinity Bight area courthouse in Newfoundland and Labrador for what would be a milestone in Canadian history. These men founded the Trinity Benefit Club (TBC), an association that would provide financial assistance to members who were sick or unable to work . Organized by the Reverend William Bullock, TBC was the only group of its kind in Canada at that time, the forerunner of workmen’s compensation programs.

World War I - A Commemoration of Residents from Trinity and Area
August 14, 1914, Britain declared war on Germany. Four days later, Newfoundland, the oldest colony of the British Empire, telegraphed London committing the colony to raise one thousand men for the naval service and several hundred for land service abroad.

 

50 Years
     

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